How were E.E. Cummings’ poems influenced by the time he lived in?

[http://www25.uua.org/uuhs/duub/articles/eecummings.html]

One of the most prolific and experimental poets of the twentieth century, Cumming cultivated a distinct style. He re-imagined the rules of grammar and even invented his own words. He is known for being weird and at times impossible to understand. He’s also a romantic whose body of work consists largely of love poems, like “i carry your heart with me (i carry it in.” In this poem, E.E. Cummings’ style is unique and highly visual. It forces a certain rhythm into the poem when you read aloud. The poem is simply saying that our life only has meaning because of love, but where did all of Cummings’ poems come from? What influenced them?

E.E. Cummings was a prominent American poet who is remember for his unique, but avant-garde style of poetry. Cummings was born into a Christian family. He practiced a “one-person” understanding of God, which led to transcendental learning his entire life. By the time he was in Harvard, modern poetry caught his interest, which eventually led to his “avant-garde” reputation. 

[http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110427094445AAAoAPr]

Throughout his life, Cummings would travel to many countries. He stayed in Paris when he enlisted to serve. His love for the city ended up becoming the main focus for many of his works in addition to his poetry. 

[http://www.essayforum.com/writing-feedback-3/e-e-cummings-have-aspects-life-influenced-poet-work-37638/]

To answer the question myself, Cummings had multiple talents in literature, one being he was an artist. I think that’s one reason he wrote the way he did. He wanted his poems to look like different, like art. He also experienced war, the roaring twenties, the great depression, and the lack of intellectualism in certain countries. These experiences were often always found in works he wrote. 

 

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Is a film version of a story helpful or harmful to the readers understanding of the author’s purposes?

 

[http://way2enjoy.com/jquery/threadpreview/1588001]

Hemingway’s story The Snows of Kilimanjaro is about a writer, Harry and his wife, Helen stranded on a safari in Africa because their truck broke down. Harry is suffering from an infection on his leg and spends time drinking and insulting Helen. Harry reviews his life in a series of flashbacks, realizing that he wasted his talent through procrastination and luxury from a marriage to a wealthy woman he doesn’t love. At the end of the story, Helen wakes and finds that Harry has been eaten by a hyena. In the movie version of the story, a lot of things were left out. Some of the flashbacks were different and at the end of the story, Harry didn’t didn’t die. The plane did eventually come and he was saved. 

[http://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/h/hemingways-short-stories/summary-and-analysis/the-snows-of-kilimanjaro]

[http://thebookvineyard.wordpress.com/2012/06/05/keeping-the-vow/]

[http://ourfaithinaction.net/2012/the-vow/the-vow-movie-wallpaper-15/]

A book turned into a movie with many changes is The Vow by Kim Carpenter. It is about a woman who is involved in a car accident and as a result goes into a coma. She gains consciousness but she wakes up with severe amnesia and her husband has to win her back all over again. The book and the movie have the same meaning, but there are some things that aren’t the same. In the book, the couple stayed together because of there faith, but in the movie they just fell in love again. The movie version doesn’t really talk about faith significantly.

[http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2012/02/16/real-life-couple-from-vow-says-it-would-have-been-nice-to-see-christian/]

 

So, is a film version of a story helpful or harmful? Yes! The Vow was only one example, but there are a lot more movies that do the same thing. I think we all have been telling a story and someone says “Well, the book wasn’t like that.”  

 

Blanche DuBois

When the play first begins, Blanche is already a fallen women. Her family’s fortune and house are gone, her husband committed suicide years earlier, and she is the talk of the town due to her indiscreet sexual behavior. She also has a bad drinking problem. Blanche is an insecure, dislocated individual. She’s an aging Southern belle of perpetual panic about her fading beauty. Her manner is dainty and frail, and she wears cheap evening clothes, but Stanley quickly sees through that and seeks information about her past.

   [http://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/s/a-streetcar-named-desire/character-analysis/blanche-dubois]

[http://boudoirqueen.typepad.com/my_weblog/2009/03/the-blanche-dubois-boudoir-trunk-show.html]

I’m pretty sure there are a lot of characters that are similar to Blanche DuBois, but to me, Blanche reminds me of Jay Gatsby from “The Great Gatsby”. Gatsby has material wealth, but experiences a lot of unfortunate events throughout his life, and so does Blanche. Some of events were Daisy leaving him for Tom and not waiting for him to come back, rumors being made about him, and Daisy leaving him again and him having to cover for Daisy killing Myrtle. Blanche had problems too. She lost the house in Mississippi and the same problems she ran away from in Mississippi came back for her in New Orleans.